Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face

Everybody has a plan until they get punched in the face

“A failure” can be a result of a software or hardware problem. A fault tolerance design intents to enable the system to continue operate properly in an event of failure. In this post I’ll talk about a way to treat a special cause of failure – a timeout using a really cool open source framework named Polly.

Raiding memory leaks in the Pyramid of PrevObject

Raiding memory leaks in the Pyramid of PrevObject

A while ago I found that interaction with a component in our site results in many detached dom elements. At first glance, it wasn't clear from the code what was causing it. 
After some research I realized that the detached dom elements are still referenced by prevObject- an internal property of all jQuery objects which is used by the jQuery .addBack() and .end() methods. 
If you're not familiar with prevObject or these two rarely used methods, you can use jQuery chaining in a way that essentially creates a memory leak. 
In my particular case the effect on the page's memory consumption was minuscule, and I'm generally against micro-optimizations. But since jQuery is used by many people, and since I couldn't find much info about this topic online, I thought I'd share.

Should we use MVC for modern web applications?

Should we use MVC for modern web applications?

MVC is one of the most commonly used design patterns in web applications. It can be used both with server and client side rendering. Frameworks like ASP.NET MVC and Angular adopted the pattern and made the development extremely easy and straight-forward.

Despite its popularity, I claim that the MVC pattern is no longer the best solution for creating rich and modern web applications.

Extracting actionable insights from web perf optimizations

Extracting actionable insights from web perf optimizations

A lot of different factors can affect a web page's performance. For this reason, truly effective Web Performance Optimization starts with identifying the most significant perf bottlenecks of your site. This is usually done with tools likeDevToolsWebPagetestPageSpeed Insights, etc. 


Once you've identified a possible lead, and taken the time to refactor and optimize it, it's important to follow-up by properly validating and understanding the impact of your change. Getting this right will help you learn whether that's something you should race to implement across your site, or a best-practice that in your particular case amounts to a micro-optimization


This type of analysis is not trivial because web performance data is typically noisy. You can reduce noise by running your optimizations as A/B experiments side-by-side with the existing implementation, and by visualizing your data with a suitable graph such has a histogram. 
This post explores these techniques in-depth.